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To return to the Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference website, go to http://www.midwestfw.org/ The following schedule and room names are subject to change (as of February 1, 2017). Please check back for updates. 

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Monday, February 6 • 2:00pm - 2:20pm
Technical Session. Septic Seepage in Minnesota Lakes and Its Biological Effects on Resident Sunfish

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AUTHORS: Les Warren, Heiko Schoenfuss - St. Cloud State University; Chris Higgins, Meaghan Guyader - Colorado School of Mines

ABSTRACT: The potential of On-site Wastewater Treatment Systems (OWTSs) to represent non-point source of contaminants into lake systems is a growing concern. Since many lakes are down-gradient of OWTSs, the septic seepage may contact surrounding groundwater and may enter shallow waters through hydrological processes. It is also in these shallow areas that many native fish species, including sunfish, spawn. For the current study, five study lakes were established in Central Minnesota. Within each of these lakes, two septic-influenced sites and two reference sites were identified. Water sampling throughout the early spring and summer established the presence and absence of contaminants at each site. Adult male sunfish were collected off of their spawning beds between May and July to explore the effects of these contaminants on the native fish species. The fish were euthanized and sampled for blood and internal organs. Liver and gonad tissues were analyzed for cellular changes and to determine maturity. The assessment of biological endpoints in sunfish and laboratory exposed fathead minnows provides a rich data matrix to test the hypothesis that septic seepage causes adverse health effects in resident fish populations in northern lakes.

Monday February 6, 2017 2:00pm - 2:20pm
Grand Ballroom C

Attendees (6)