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To return to the Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference website, go to http://www.midwestfw.org/ The following schedule and room names are subject to change (as of February 1, 2017). Please check back for updates. 

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Tuesday, February 7 • 8:20am - 8:40am
Technical Session. Effect of Elevated Nutrients and Sediments on Growth of Juvenile Black and White Crappies

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AUTHORS: David Bogner, University of Illinois; David H Wahl Illinois Natural History Survey

ABSTRACT: Anthropogenic influences can cause dramatic increases in turbidity through sediment and nutrient inputs to lakes and reservoirs. Increased nutrients can affect fish growth via increased productivity whereas increased sediments can decrease reactive distance and reduce feeding rates. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of increased nutrients and sediments on growth of juvenile Black Crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) and White Crappie (Pomoxis annularis). We selected these species as they exhibit similar feeding ontogeny and co-occur in many systems but are hypothesized to respond to turbidity differently with Black Crappie being more negatively affected. We examined growth in mesocosms with nutrient and sediment additions over a four week period using species as a split-plot within a full factorial model of nutrients and sediments. Environmental variables were collected weekly and averaged over the course of the study and used as covariates. We detected a significant effect of sediment on change in weight with Black Crappie expressing greater growth than Black White except in the presence of increased turbidity. Our results highlight the importance of parsing out the drivers of increased turbidity to better understand the effects on fish growth.

Tuesday February 7, 2017 8:20am - 8:40am
Grand Ballroom B

Attendees (11)