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Tuesday, February 7 • 1:40pm - 2:00pm
Technical Session. Are Fish Avoiding You? Behavioral Syndromes and Fishing-induced Behavioral Change in Ambloplites Rupestris

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AUTHORS: Alexis D. Fedele, Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, and School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Christopher J. Chizinski, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Joseph J. Fontaine, U.S. Geological Survey—Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, and School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Kevin L. Pope, U.S. Geological Survey—Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, and School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln


ABSTRACT: Studies demonstrate that catch-and-release angling may result in reduced catchability over time, which suggests angling-induced behavioral change. Further, behavioral syndromes have also been suggested to influence a fish’s vulnerability to angling. Using Rock Bass Ambloplites rupestris in laboratory experiments, we assessed the influence of behavioral syndromes on a fish’s ability to alter its behavior in response to anglers over seven consecutive days of fishing. Ration level and lure type, which consisted of a wire with a worm, a simple worm on a hook, and a roadrunner jig with a worm, were also varied across treatments to assess the role of hunger and visual cues on a fish’s propensity to be caught. Bolder indviduals exhibited a greater probability of capture across treatment types compared to shier individuals. Ration level did not appear to have an affect on an the probability of capture. The lure treatment exhibited a lower initial probablity of capture than the worm and control treatments across behavioral types, with the control treatment showing little change over fishing days. The learned avoidance of capture has strong implications for fishing-induced evolution, efficacy of management regulations and satisfaction of anglers.

Tuesday February 7, 2017 1:40pm - 2:00pm
Grand Ballroom B

Attendees (14)