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To return to the Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference website, go to http://www.midwestfw.org/ The following schedule and room names are subject to change (as of February 1, 2017). Please check back for updates. 

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Tuesday, February 7 • 11:40am - 12:00pm
Technical Session. Biology and Potential Community Influences of Tadpole Madtoms and Stonecats in the Minnesota River

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AUTHORS: Shannon J. Fisher, Cameron Brock - Minnesota State University, Mankato

ABSTRACT: Tadpole Madtoms Noturus gyrinus and Stonecats Noturus flavus are an often overlooked and underappreciated component of the Ictaluridae species found in the Minnesota River.  With high reproductive potential, these two species can be found at high density and therefore have a potentially substantial place in riverine foodwebs.  However, insufficient data are available to evaluate the potential associations of Tadpole Madtom and Stonecat with other recreationally important species.  We assessed the biology of these two species from Minnesota River samples to obtain data regarding population dynamics and food habits.  These preliminary findings were then compared with literature and other previously secured information for other Ictaluridae species of the Minnesota River.  The populations were dominated by relatively young individuals, however this may be the result of gear bias.  Food habits were similar to those reported from other populations and were, however, very similar to those reported for other important recreational and commercial fishes.  Therefore, further consideration of the potential influence Tadpole Madtom and Stonecat may exert on the foodweb would be a worthy effort.

Tuesday February 7, 2017 11:40am - 12:00pm
Grand Ballroom C

Attendees (10)