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To return to the Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference website, go to http://www.midwestfw.org/ The following schedule and room names are subject to change (as of February 1, 2017). Please check back for updates. 

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Tuesday, February 7 • 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Poster Display. Benthic Foragers Selecting for the New Zealand Mud Snail

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AUTHORS: James Beaubien, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University; Jerrod Lepper, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University; Mitchell Nisbet, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University; Daniel Hayes, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University

ABSTRACT: James Beaubien

Jerrod Lepper

Mitchell Nisbet

Daniel Hayes

Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824

Tags:  New Zealand Mud Snails, invasive species, predation

New Zealand Mud Snails have recently invaded the Great Lakes region, and during the past 2-3 years, have been found in several rivers in the state of Michigan.  The Pere Marquette River is the first river where this species was detected in inland waters, and the population of mud snails has grown dramatically since first detection.  Fishery managers have concern over the potential impact this species will have on the important fisheries of the Pere Marquette and other rivers, however, little is known about the ecology of this species in the Great Lakes region.  New Zealand mud snails have been documented to be consumed by trout, and have even been shown capable of surviving through their gastrointestinal tract.  To our knowledge, there have been no investigations of foraging by other fish species on New Zealand mud snails.  Species like mottled sculpin, white sucker, and redhorse sucker might be anticipated to be more efficient foragers than trout due to their feeding ecology.  As such, we collected specimens of these species at sites infested with New Zealand mud snails and uninfested sites to determine whether these species consume mud snails, and if the presence of mud snails alters their foraging preferences.  

Tuesday February 7, 2017 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Lancaster Ballroom

Attendees (2)